Journal of Child and Youth Care Work http://acycpjournal.pitt.edu/ojs/jcycw <p><strong>Journal Update</strong>: Currently the first 25 issues of the <em>Journal for Child and Youth Care Work</em> are being prepared to be uploaded to this site.&nbsp; Please be patient as we enter all of the data.&nbsp; We hope to get the articles that we have received loaded onto this site by August 2019 so please check back then. (June 8, 2019)</p> <p><strong>Welcome to the<em> Journal of the Child and Youth Work</em>&nbsp;(JCYCW)</strong>, an open-source, peer-reviewed, yearly online publication. JCYCW is the official journal of the Association for Child and Youth Care Practice (ACYCP) whose mission is to engage practitioners in building the child and&nbsp;youth care profession through collaborative partnerships, promoting innovative training and education, shaping public policy and informing developmental practice through research and scholarship.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> University Library System, University of Pittsburgh en-US Journal of Child and Youth Care Work 0741-9481 <p>Authors who publish with this journal agree to the following terms:</p> <ol> <li>The Author retains copyright in the Work, where the term “Work” shall include all digital objects that may result in subsequent electronic publication or distribution.</li> <li>Upon acceptance of the Work, the author shall grant to the Publisher the right of first publication of the Work.</li> <li>The Author shall grant to the Publisher and its agents the nonexclusive perpetual right and license to publish, archive, and make accessible the Work in whole or in part in all forms of media now or hereafter known under a&nbsp;<a title="CC-BY" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/">Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License</a>&nbsp;or its equivalent, which, for the avoidance of doubt, allows others to copy, distribute, and transmit the Work under the following conditions: <ol type="a"> <li>Attribution—other users must attribute the Work in the manner specified by the author as indicated on the journal Web site;</li> </ol> with the understanding that the above condition can be waived with permission from the Author and that where the Work or any of its elements is in the public domain under applicable law, that status is in no way affected by the license.</li> <li>The Author is able to enter into separate, additional contractual arrangements for the nonexclusive distribution of the journal's published version of the Work (e.g., post it to an institutional repository or publish it in a book), as long as there is provided in the document an acknowledgement of its initial publication in this journal.</li> <li>Authors are permitted and encouraged to post online a prepublication manuscript (but not the Publisher’s final formatted PDF version of the Work) in institutional repositories or on their Websites prior to and during the submission process, as it can lead to productive exchanges, as well as earlier and greater citation of published work. Any such posting made before acceptance and publication of the Work shall be updated upon publication to include a reference to the Publisher-assigned DOI (Digital Object Identifier) and a link to the online abstract for the final published Work in the Journal.</li> <li>Upon Publisher’s request, the Author agrees to furnish promptly to Publisher, at the Author’s own expense, written evidence of the permissions, licenses, and consents for use of third-party material included within the Work, except as determined by Publisher to be covered by the principles of Fair Use.</li> <li>The Author represents and warrants that: <ol type="a"> <li>the Work is the Author’s original work;</li> <li>the Author has not transferred, and will not transfer, exclusive rights in the Work to any third party;</li> <li>the Work is not pending review or under consideration by another publisher;</li> <li>the Work has not previously been published;</li> <li>the Work contains no misrepresentation or infringement of the Work or property of other authors or third parties; and</li> <li>the Work contains no libel, invasion of privacy, or other unlawful matter.</li> </ol> </li> <li>The Author agrees to indemnify and hold Publisher harmless from Author’s breach of the representations and warranties contained in Paragraph 6 above, as well as any claim or proceeding relating to Publisher’s use and publication of any content contained in the Work, including third-party content.</li> <li>The Author agrees to digitally sign the Publisher’s final formatted PDF version of the Work.</li> </ol> Experiential Teaching and Learning in Child and Youth Care Work: http://acycpjournal.pitt.edu/ojs/jcycw/article/view/5 <p>The Graduate Diploma in Youth Work is in its fifth year at Concordia University in Montreal. &nbsp;In a department committed to experiential teaching and the training of practitioners, a large focus of the program is to immerse students in experiences that prepare them for engaging in reflexive and theoretically informed approaches to practice. The purpose of this article will be to&nbsp;illustrate&nbsp;our program model through four learning activities that are representative of our&nbsp;unique approach to youth worker education. An additional focus will be the ways in which our model and these activities align with the Association for Child and Youth Care Practice competencies.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; A model of integrative youth work education was developed in 2015 by Ranahan, Blanchet-Cohen and Mann-Feder to form the basis for an advanced Graduate Diploma in youth work in Montreal, Quebec (Concordia University, n.d.). The purpose of this article is to share four structured experiential learning activities that illustrate this model. Prior to describing the activities, an overview of our approach to integrative youth work will be provided, along with a discussion of how it aligns with the competencies for practice developed by the Association for Child and Youth Care Practice (ACYCP) (Association for Child and Youth Care Practice, 2010).</p> Varda Mann-Feder Copyright (c) 2020 Varda Mann-Feder http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2020-12-09 2020-12-09 26 10.5195/jcycw.2020.5 Perceptions of Mentors and Mentees in School-based Cross-Age Peer Mentoring in a Low-income Rural Community http://acycpjournal.pitt.edu/ojs/jcycw/article/view/12 <p>Cross-age peer mentoring programs are not always effective, and some researchers have questioned the effectiveness of this model.&nbsp; In this article, we use evaluation data to describe a project that has been going for twenty years.&nbsp; The project enrolls high school students as mentors to struggling elementary school students.&nbsp; The article reviews the current literature and details the perceptions of mentors and mentees regarding relational and academic benefits and disappointments.&nbsp; Both mentors and mentees report that the project gave them purpose, motivation, and a sense of belonging in the school and community.&nbsp; They also describe frustrations and regrets.&nbsp; Some findings echo previous studies; however, by presenting a twenty-year retrospective, and including mentor and mentee voices, the article provides a unique contribution to the field.&nbsp; The article provides an appendix with resources and recommendations for effective practices to those seeking to implement such a program.</p> Donna Marie San Antonio Jeff Martel Cindy Weisbart Copyright (c) 2020 Donna Marie San Antonio, Jeff Martel, Cindy Weisbart http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 2020-12-09 2020-12-09 26 10.5195/jcycw.2020.12